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July 16, 2016 / Leslie

Savour: Salads for All Seasons

Savour_20160716_115006Salads for All Seasons
by Peter Gordon

Publisher: Jacqui Small LLP
Publish Date: April 2016
Format: Hardcover | 272 pages
Rating: 5 of 5

In this new collection of recipes, TV chef Peter Gordon has presented a wide range of salads. From starter to main dish, warm or cold, simple or complex, for vegetarians and for those who eat meat, there is something for everyone and a wide variety of ingredient choices.

The book opens with a short intro on the elements of a salad and followed by recipe chapters which are divided by main ingredient: Grains, cheese, fish, poultry, and meat. It closes with a chapter on salad dressings.

Gorgeous photos and layout.

Physically, this is a gorgeous book. It is a full-color, hardcover edition with close-up, detailed photos of the finished dishes. The layout is excellent making the book easy to use. On the page opposite the photo is the recipe with an introduction and the ingredient list.

Grilled Courgettes and Broccolini

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Planning ahead necessary, but worth it.

When I think of a salad, I usually think of a quick and easy-to-prepare meal. That is not the case with many of these recipes, and most of these dishes will take a little planning.

Many of the ingredients used are not common grocery store items and may be difficult for some people to find. Those in larger cities will have an easier time, especially if produce markets or stores like Whole Foods are in the area. Growing your own herbs and veggies is also an option for those who have gardens. The author does realize that all of the ingredients he uses may not be readily available and provides alternatives and suggestions in the introduction to the recipe.

Inspiration for creative cooks.

The instructions are easy to follow and most cooks should have no problem putting these salads together. The experienced cook will be inspired by the creative combination of ingredients, textures, and colors to create a combination of their own.

Regardless of one’s level of experience, this book will make a wonderful addition to every cook’s bookshelf.


wkendcookingThis post is linked to Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads.
Participation is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, fabulous quotations, photographs.


Source: Review copy provided by the publisher through AmazonVine.
© 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 13, 2016 / Leslie

Wordless Wednesday: Morning in the Garden

BackyardGarden_20160711_075718

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More Wordless Wednesday. © 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 11, 2016 / Leslie

Mailbox Monday ~ July 11th

SpringBirdsFenceMailbox-smlWelcome to Mailbox Monday, created by Marcia of To Be Continued, a place where readers share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

After several years of being on tour with different blogs as the monthly host, the Mailbox Monday Blog is now the permanent home for the meme.


 
 
I received one new book in the mail and a couple of audio downloads last week.

New Arrivals

BooksJuly11_20160710_180801

Valley of the Moon by Melanie Gideon from LibraryThing.
A woman who feels lost in her own time stumbles across a California community that has, impossibly, been marooned in the early twentieth century.

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Audio Downloads

GeneLilyAndTheOctopus

The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee from Simon and Schuster.
A magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information?

Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley from Simon and Schuster.
Lily and the Octopus reminds us how it feels to love fiercely, how difficult it can be to let go, and how the fight for those we love is the greatest fight of all. Remember the last book you told someone they had to read? Lily and the Octopus is the next one.

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© 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 9, 2016 / Leslie

Book Review: Missing, Presumed

A Rapid Review

MissingPresumed2Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner

Publisher: Random House | June 2016
Format: Hardcover 368 pages | Rating: 3 stars
Genre: Mystery

For readers of Kate Atkinson and Tana French comes a page-turning literary mystery that brings to life the complex and wholly relatable Manon Bradshaw, a strong-willed detective assigned to a high-risk missing persons case.

Edith Hind, a beautiful graduate student and daughter of the surgeon to the Royal Family, has gone missing under suspicious circumstances. Manon Bradshaw is the detective on the case. At 39 and single, she has a solid career and loves her job but still longs for a family of her own.

This was a classic police procedural with alternating perspectives along with a 3rd party point-of-view. It was very character driven which made the mystery slow-paced. At times we got so wrapped up in Manon’s life, I almost forgot we were trying to solve a mystery.

For those who enjoy very literary mysteries, this book might be a good choice; however, I like a little more suspense and complexity in the plot. All told, I liked Manon and thought she was a well-developed and interesting character.

An Under My Apple Tree Rapid Review
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Source: Review copy provided by Random House through LibraryThing.
© 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 6, 2016 / Leslie

Wordless Wednesday: Purple Prairie Clover

PrairieClover_IMG_5537

Almost wordless: Butterflies and bees love this native prairie wildflower.

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More Wordless Wednesday. © 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 4, 2016 / Leslie

Mailbox Monday ~ July 4th

FlagMailbox-smlWelcome to Mailbox Monday, created by Marcia of To Be Continued, a place where readers share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

After several years of being on tour with different blogs as the monthly host, the Mailbox Monday Blog is now the permanent home for the meme.


 
 
Today is Independence Day in the US. For those celebrating, have a safe and fun-filled day.

New Arrivals

BooksJuly4_20160703_183801

This Is the Story of You by Beth Kephart. A win from The Reading Date and Chronicle Books.
Gripping and poetic, This Is the Story of You is about the beauty of nature and the power of family, about finding hope in the wake of tragedy and recovery in the face of overwhelming loss.

The Value of the Moon: Bringing Space Into Our Economic Sphere by Paul D. Spudis from AmazonVine.
Spudis explores three reasons for returning to the Moon: it is close, it is interesting, and it is useful.

A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression by Jane Ziegelman, Andy Coe from Harper.
An in-depth exploration of the greatest food crisis the nation has ever faced—the Great Depression—and how it transformed America’s culinary culture.

Savour: Salads for All Seasons by Peter Gordon from AmazonVine.
Acclaimed chef Peter Gordon shows us that salads are versatile and fun dishes that harmoniously combine a mixture of individually prepared ingredients.

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© 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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July 2, 2016 / Leslie

Weekend Birding: Robin Fledglings

One of the birding activities I’m involved in is Project Nestwatch, a citizen science program. It is a nationwide monitoring project designed to track status and trends of nesting birds. I try to find nests that are easy to observe and not disturb the birds. Usually that is in my own backyard.

Robins are fairly reliable residents. I have a pair in my yard every year, sometimes two, with one in the front yard and one in back. Problem is, they are very good at hiding their nests. I knew there was a robin’s nest in my maple tree because building material was being carried in, then food was being delivered, but I never found the nest. Until one morning when I went out to fill the feeders and saw this little guy perched on my barrel of lettuce . . .

Fledgling Robin

RobinFledgling

From the length of his tail, the tuft of feathers on his head, and the fact that he was in awe of his surroundings and not moving, I knew this bird had just left the elusive nest.

I could hear one of the parents calling. A few feet away I saw one of them, probably dad, with a beak full of insects. There is even a little green worm on head.

Parent Robin with Food

RobinFeedingFledgling_IMG_5382

Both parents will feed the youngsters for a while until they learn to find food for themselves, but the primary caregiver is the male. The female is busy looking for a secure place to build her second nest of the season. Robins don’t reuse their nests so the process starts over from the beginning.

I filled the feeders and left so the parents could get on with their job of teaching this little one how to survive.

 


Saturday Snapshot is hosted by Melinda of West Metro Mommy. Visit her blog to see more great photos.

© 2016 Under My Apple Tree. All rights reserved.
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